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    Applying to College Class of 2020 Presentation 

     

     

    Want a list of every college and their deadlines and other information?  Click here

     

     Sophomore and Junior Parents - MEFA will be presenting College Admissions on November 13th at 6:30pm.  Great opportunity to get started on the college process.

     

    Senior Year:
     
     
    Junior Year:
     
     
    Sophomore Year:
     
     

    College Admission Glossary: 

     

     

    ACT

    A standardized college admission test. It features four main sections: English, math, reading and science — and an optional essay section.

    Admission Tests

    Also known as college entrance exams, these are tests designed to measure students’ skills and help colleges evaluate how ready students are for college-level work. The ACT and the College Board’s SAT are two standardized admission tests used in the United States. The word "standardized" means that the test measures the same thing in the same way for everyone who takes it. 

    Coalition Application

    A standard application form accepted by members of the Coalition for Access, Affordability, and Success. You can use this application to apply to any of the more than 90 colleges and universities that are members of the Coalition.

    Common Application

    A standard application form accepted by all colleges that are members of the Common Application association. You can fill out this application once and submit it to any one — or several — of the nearly 700 colleges that accept it. 

    Deferred Admission

    Permission from a college that has accepted you to postpone enrolling in the college. The postponement is usually for up to one year.

    Early Action (EA)

    An option to submit your applications before the regular deadlines. When you apply early action, you get admission decisions from colleges earlier than usual. Early action plans are not binding, which means that you do not have to enroll in a college if you are accepted early action. Some colleges have an early action option called EA II, which has a later application deadline than their regular EA plan. 

    Early Decision (ED)

    An option to submit an application to your first-choice college before the regular deadline. When you apply early decision, you get an admission decision earlier than usual. Early decision plans are binding. You agree to enroll in the college immediately if admitted and offered a financial aid package that meets your needs. Some colleges have an early decision option called ED II, which has a later application deadline than their regular ED plan. 

    Grade Point Average (GPA)

    A number that shows overall academic performance. It’s computed by assigning a point value to each grade you earn. See also Weighted Grade Point Average.

    Legacy Applicant

    A college applicant with a relative (usually a parent or grandparent) who graduated from that college. Some colleges give preference to legacy applicants (also called “legacies”).

    Need-Blind Admission

    A policy of making admission decisions without considering the financial circumstances of applicants. Colleges that use this policy may not offer enough financial aid to meet a student’s full need.

    Open Admission

    A policy of accepting any high school graduate, no matter what his or her grades are, until all spaces in the incoming class are filled. Almost all two-year community colleges have an open-admission policy. However, a college with a general open-admission policy may have admission requirements for certain programs.

    Priority Date or Deadline

    The date by which your application — whether it’s for college admission, student housing or financial aid — must be received to be given the strongest consideration.

    Rolling Admission

    An admission policy of considering each application as soon as all required information (such as high school records and test scores) has been received, rather than setting an application deadline and reviewing applications in a batch. Colleges that use a rolling admission policy usually notify applicants of admission decisions quickly.

    SAT

    The College Board’s standardized college admission test. It features three main sections: math, reading and writing, which includes a written essay. 

    SAT Subject Tests

    Hour-long, content-based college admission tests that allow you to showcase achievement in specific subject areas: English, history, math, science and languages. Some colleges use Subject Tests to place students into the appropriate courses as well as in admission decisions. Based on your performance on the test(s), you could potentially fulfill basic requirements or earn credit for introductory-level courses.

    Transcript

    The official record of your course work at a school or college. Your high school transcript is usually required for college admission and for some financial aid packages.

    Universal College Application

    A standard application form accepted by all colleges that are Universal College Application members. You can fill out this application once and submit it to any one — or several — of the more than 3,044 colleges that accept it. 

    Waiting List

    The list of applicants who may be admitted to a college if space becomes available. Colleges wait to hear if all the students they accepted decide to attend. If students don’t enroll and there are empty spots, a college may fill them with students who are on the waiting list.